Brittni Jacobson

Brittni is the Public Engagement placement student at the Canadian Women's Foundation. She is currently enrolled in the Professional Writing and Communications program at Humber College. She loves reading, travelling and bad reality TV.

Inspiring Girls to be Amazing: Circles of Care-Circles of Courage

Each Thursday night, Jennifer, a Malahat Nation Elder, has an important job to do. As a facilitator of the Circles of Care-Circles of Courage girls’ group, she’s in charge of the carpool.

Before each session, she makes the drive to pick up girls from her community and the neighbouring Cowichan Nation. When the program first launched in 2016, the girls didn’t say much during carpool. Now, when they see Jennifer’s car pull up, they come bounding out of their homes, full of excitement. The girls’ group has become one of the best parts of their week.

10 Books Every Woman Should Read This Summer: Recommendations from Canadian Women’s Foundation Staff and Supporters

 
There’s nothing better than a summer day spent reading in the sun. But the abundance of book releases can make finding a great story tough. Luckily, the Canadian Women’s Foundation staff and supporters have done some reading and are ready to share their recommendations!
 
Each book celebrates strong women whose stories will stick with you long after you read the last page. Let us know what you’ve been reading and what you think of our picks in the comments below!
 
FOUNDATION STAFF’S RECOMMENDATIONS

"When Sadie’s father is arrested for sexual impropriety, a small town reels, the media descends, and her seemingly perfect life unravels. This page-turner confronts many topical issues surrounding sexual assault, illustrating how one case plays out in family, a community, and the justice system."
- Jessica Howard
Senior Writer, Public Engagement

Women’s Monuments and Landmarks Across Canada

Did you know there are dozens of landmarks across Canada that recognize strong women from our country’s history?
 
Some celebrate the progress we’ve made, while others are a reminder of the work we still have to do.
 
Add some feminism to your summer plans by visiting one of these landmarks in your province or territory – or planning a road trip to see them all!  
 
Spirit of the BeothukBoyd’s Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador
This life-sized bronze statue recognizes the Beothuk woman Shanawdithit, likely the last of her people. She recorded detailed sketches and accounts of Beothuk history, culture, and traditions. Without her work, much of what we know about the Beothuk people would have been lost.
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Challenging Gender Stereotypes to Prove #ABoyCanToo: Q&A with Kirsten McGoey

When photographer Kirsten McGoey was searching for a fresh way to practice her art, she didn’t have to look far for inspiration: her middle son sparked her photo series #ABoyCanToo. “He beats to his own drum,” says Kirsten. “While a lover of math and science, he is often drawn to things that are not considered male by society.”    

#ABoyCanToo is a series of lifestyle and studio portraits featuring boys aged 4-16 whose interests and hobbies defy gender norms. "The objective is to support the boys who are making these choices, and who are influencing people to understand that they are acceptable choices for young men to make,” says Kirsten, who launched the project out of her hometown of Whitby, Ontario in 2016.

In the following Q&A, she discusses how the photoshoots empower boys, and how challenging gender stereotypes relates to gender equality. 

Empowering Girls Through Culture, History, and Friendship: Strong Girls of Inlailawatash

When a shy girl gradually emerges from her shell and develops the confidence to lead a group activity, Jennifer Hamman knows that the Strong Girls of Inlailawatash program is succeeding.

“Just seeing them take those opportunities to take a little risk, to be a little vulnerable, and to let themselves just be themselves has been a really awesome thing to watch.”

The program, which receives funding from the Canadian Women's Foundation, provides a rare girls-only space for Tsleil-Waututh First Nation girls aged 9-13.

The Tsleil-Waututh community is set on the Burrard Inlet, surrounded by urban North Vancouver. As program coordinator, Hamman organizes the weekly program meetings, which aim to foster healthy relationships and connect the girls to their culture in a positive way. Hamman, who is also the Tsleil-Waututh Community Therapist, talks about how the program helps develop girls’ confidence, connectedness, and resilience.

Justice for Sexual Assault Survivors: A Look at Alternative Methods

This March, federal court justice Robin Camp resigned after a 15-month inquiry. His conduct during the questioning of a 19-year-old woman during a rape trial included wildly inappropriate comments like “sex and pain sometimes go together.” During the inquiry, the woman said the experience left her with suicidal thoughts.

That same month, a Nova Scotia judge acquitted a taxi driver who was charged with sexual assault on the basis that his passenger, although heavily intoxicated, was capable of consent. Police had found the man with his pants unbuttoned and holding the woman’s urine-soaked underwear, while she lay unconscious and half-naked in the back of his cab.