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Must Reads for the Week of December 20

Since it’s almost the end of the year, here are two yearend roundups worth a read – the 28 most Iconic Feminist Moments of 2013 and the 10 most sexist ads of 2013.

To help you through the holidays, listen to the “Most Popular Feminist Mixtapes Ever”, as you read 50 shocking facts about rape in America.

This week, Ana courageously shared her sex trafficking experience in San Francisco while Anna created her own Photoshop ads to mock the abuse of this tool by mainstream media.

Read why “Cyberbullying” Bill C-13 fails to protect cyber sexual assaults against girls and an eye-opening article about a daughter’s experience with her mother’s own body shaming.

If you've come across an article you think other readers should know about, leave us a comment and share the link! 

  1. Here are the 28 most Iconic Feminist Moments of 2013. 
     
  2. A look back at the 10 most sexists ads of 2013 around the world. 
     
  3. 15 years after R. Kelly’s sexual predation on teenage girls case exploded in media, we learn about the “stomach-churning” truths of his sexual assault accusations.
     
  4. While relaxing with friends and families during the holidays, why not listen to the Most Popular Feminist Mixtapes Ever.
     
  5. Suraya Chemaly in an attempt to inform people on the subject of rape, presents 50 Facts About Rape that may shock you.
     
  6. Mock ads created by Anna Hill to show how mainstream media overuse and abuse Photoshop.
     
  7. Watch the incredible strength of Ana in sharing her story to raise awareness about sex trafficking in San Francisco and the courageous work City Impact is doing.
     
  8. Read why the umbrella term “cyberbullying” and Bill C-13 lack a gender lens analysis and ultimately fail to tackle the issue of cyber sexual violence against young women.
     
  9. Kasey Edwards writes about a conversation with her mother, her first and most influential role model, who taught her to believe that she too was “fat, ugly and horrible”.
     
  10. What Do Dress Codes Say About Girls’ Bodies?

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